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Posted Thursday, Oct 24, 2013 

The Visiting Writers Program continued this week with the visit of US Poet Laureate Robert HassSeniors in AP Poetry had the opportunity to meet for a lively discussion of the art of poetic translation during an EOP session. The girls posed questions throughout the discussion--and were clearly delighted by Hass' thoughtful answers. He shared lively stories from his work translating both traditional Japanese haiku and the poetry of his friend and neighbor, Czeslaw Milosz. The session concluded with a challenge: Hass asked the seniors to try their hand at translating a Rilke poem, beautifully read and sight-translated by senior Alice Z.'14.

Hass will return to Castilleja on November 6th for an all-school assembly, then meet again with the AP Poetry students to continue our conversation.  We can't wait to hear more from this wise and vibrant poet.

Posted Thursday, Oct 24, 2013 

Former U.S. Poet Laureate and translator Robert Hass visited the library to speak with seniors about the art of translation. In a presentation with Q&A sprinkled throughout, he answered the students' questions about his experiences and shared funny stories of mistranslation, challenges with rhyme, and more. He will return on November 6 to speak before the entire student body.

Posted Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 

¿Hablas español? It turns out that a large contingent of the Castilleja community speaks Spanish! Over 60 students, teachers, parents, and other Casti folks united for a festive celebration of delicious food and fun conversation. From Spanish sing-alongs, to Spanish Bingo!, to the ever-popular piñata, everyone had a fantastic time. People are already eagerly planning the next evening, so stay tuned for future opportunities to practice your Spanish!

Posted Monday, Oct 21, 2013 

Castilleja is proud to announce that three semifinalists and two regional finalists in the 2013 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology hail from Castilleja! Despite student participation (2,440) and project submissions (1,599) reaching an all-time high, five Casti girls finished at the top:

Among the 15 regional finalists in California:
- Ayesha Bajwa '14 - astrophysics
- Smriti Pramanick '14 - astrophysics

Among the 51 semifinalists in California:
- Kiana Borjian '16 - astrophysics
- Sarah Dunn '15 - ecology & evolutionary biology
- Tara Thakurta '16 - ecology & evolutionary biology

Ayesha and Smriti will advance to the next level of the competition at CalTech (November 15-16), where they will contend for one of the most prestigious science awards for high school students. Good luck ladies! 

Also, a huge thank you to University of California Santa Cruz and the Science Internship Program (SIP) for providing such meaningful projects and experiences for high school students. Of the 16 Castilleja students that participated in the 2013 SIP Program, 11 submitted papers to the Siemens Competition, and, as seen above, 5 placed as either a semi or regional finalist. 

 

Posted Friday, Oct 18, 2013 

On Thursday Castilleja's Parent Ed team hosted a talk by Tony Wagner about his new book, Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World. Dr. Wagner is an Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology and Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard, as well as a former teacher, administrator, and co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research centers on the knowledge, skills, and abilities today's students will need to succeed in the 21st century.

At Castilleja Dr. Wagner focused on the key forces for cultivating innovation (play, passion, and purpose), and how both parents and educators can create an environment which fosters students' creativity. Following his talk, History Teacher Jeannine Marston facilitated a panel discussion featuring Casti faculty members Brian Valek (Physics), Helen Shanks (Art), Evelyne Nicolaou (French), and Rebecca Sherouse (English), who posed questions to Dr. Wagner stemming from their own innovative teaching at Castilleja.

Posted Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 

Each year, members of Stanford's incoming freshman class are invited to acknowledge a former teacher or mentor who played a significant role in their intellectual, academic, social and personal development, as part of the university's Teacher Tribute Initiative. Congratulations to Josh Genauer, who was recognized this year by Camille Townshend '13.

Posted Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 

Ada's Cafe and Catering was recently recognized as a recipient of the Nickels for Non-Profit Award, starting September 30 and lasting through January 19. Stop by the Whole Foods in Palo Alto, with your reusable bags, to show your support!

The way it works: when you bring in your own, REUSABLE, bag for groceries at Whole Foods, you will have the option to donate 5¢ either to the Nickels for Non-Profit fund or toward your purchase. That’s 5¢ per bag! Please help support Casti's partner, Ada's Cafe, and two other local businesses, by donating to the program. 

If you have any questions, please contact Emily Entress in the ACE Center. 

Posted Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 

On Wednesday, October 16th from 1:45-4pm, the American Cancer Society Club is partnering with My Blue Dots to hold a Carnival for a Cure. All of the proceeds will go toward cancer research and patient support. The girls will be having face paint stations ($1), selling t-shirts ($20) and baked goods, running card-making stations, and holding a raffle (featuring cool prizes such as iTunes, Coldstone Creamery, Jamba Juice, and Chuck's Donuts gift cards; a 10-pack of classes to Avalon Yoga; and a My Blue Dots handblown ornament and book)! Raffle tickets are only $1 so if you're looking for a gift, have a sweet tooth, would like to provide a treat for your advisory, and/or want to support cancer research, please join in the fun!

American Cancer Society mission:
To ELIMINATE cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer and saving lives
To DIMINISH suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service

My Blue Dots mission:
To HONOR cancer warriors who wear the blue dots
To INFORM others what the blue dots are
To GIVE to cancer research so we can find a cure for cancer in our lifetime

What are the blue dots?
Cancer patients who go through radiation have permanent blue dot tattoos on their body to serve as markers for the radiation beams during the treatments.

Posted Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 

October 11 was International Day of the Girl Child, a United Nations-recognized day inspired by Malala Yousafzai. This year's theme was "Innovate to Educate." Why do YOU believe the world should educate its girls?

Castilleja celebrated with a variety of events throughout the day. At break, Ms. Entress from the ACE Center and Ms. Gómez from the library had badges for the girls to wear or to display on their lockers, computers, or notebooks with inspirational quotes and fill-in-the-blanks. Girls also added their thoughts to a communal bulletin board with the prompt "Girls + Education =" and the library (with the aid of Alex Z. '15) displayed books that helped students learn more about girls around the world through fact and fiction.

Facebook and Twitter were also abuzz. Check out hashtag #IDG2013 to see what the world had to say about this important day!

Posted Friday, Oct 4, 2013 

Congratulations to Caroline H. '15, who is one of the fifteen winners selected from a record-breaking 7,478 applicants from 75 countries to receive the Poetry Society's Foyle Young Poet of the Year Award for her sestina "Ya'aburnee." According to David Morley, one of the judges, "Foyle Young Poets has become a focus for poetic enterprise, achievement and daring. World poetry, you might say, begins here." The award includes a one-week residential writing workshop, the Arvon Course, in Shropshire, England during February Break. Caroline says, "I'm so excited, and I'm so grateful to Ms. Ross for her support!"

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Student Life
Posted 07/23/2014 08:30AM

26 enthusiastic Middle School French students traveled to Paris in June with Evelyne Nicolaou, Doris Mourad, and Lauren Schryver. In addition to visiting renowned sites such as Notre Dame, the Louvre, Versailles, and Giverny, they also spent a morning in a girls' school, took a cooking class during which the girls prepared their own dinner, learned how to make baguettes and croissants at a top bakery in Paris, and spent an afternoon in the outskirts of Paris at a Maison Bourgeoise, where American pilots hid during World War II. The highlight for most was engaging with peers at St. Pie Catholic School in St. Cloud. A number of the girls exchanged emails and addresses to keep in touch!



Posted 07/17/2014 08:31AM

On Casti's campus athletes are taking advantage of the summer to brush up on technique. Castilleja's Varsity coaches are conducting summer clinics for girls. Volleyball Head Coach Jac Heler just completed four days of clinics for both Middle School and Upper School athletes. Softball Coach Robert Burley will run a Middle School clinic August 11th through 15th. For more information click here or contact Athletic Director Mary Jo Pruitt.

Posted 07/14/2014 11:25AM

In Jill Helms' laboratory at Stanford University — past a glass case filled with skulls of mice, ducks and a two-headed pig and shelves stocked with glass beakers and rows of chemicals — a group of high school interns are gathered around a lab work space feverishly working on a set of experiments.

As one intern gently applies a piece of transparent film onto a slide of a mouse tibia sliced as thin as tissue paper, recent Castilleja graduate Stephanie Flamen consults with research assistant Andrew Smith regarding the section of human DNA sequence displayed on her laptop. The sequence has not mutated the way she had hoped.

In her third summer working at the lab, Flamen is helping a group of researchers who are studying the stem cells of hair follicles and how certain proteins in the cells can be stimulated to trigger hair growth and potentially treat baldness, aid cancer patients who have lost hair or help individuals with alopecia.

"When you're bald you are still harboring stem cells, but the hair is in its resting phase. They've lost some signaling that would control the hair to keep growing," Flamen says as she excitedly explained her team's work. "We found a certain protein that could (give signals to cells) and could make hair grow longer, which was so cool because we're like, 'Oh, my God, we found the solution to Rogaine' — or a better version of it."

Flamen is just one of the many young students passionate about science who choose to spend their summers doing internships working directly with graduate and doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars and faculty who lead publicly and privately funded science research at institutions like Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, Stanford School of Medicine, NASA Ames and Lockheed Martin.

Far from washing glassware and fetching coffee, interns are given the responsibility to directly help with the research, involved in tasks like pipetting bimolecular samples, using high-tech lab equipment, analyzing vast amounts of data and programming. Oftentimes the work is later included in the research's findings in scientific papers.

In their 30 to 40 hours per week for eight to 10 weeks, interns may want to explore a future career; others are curious about the real-world applications of the science they study in school. Some seek job experience and a boost for college applications or the chance to enter their work in national competitions like the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology or the Intel Science Talent Search.

And many of their mentors say the internships not only directly provide more manpower towards their research but give them a chance to inspire the next generation to pursue science and show them that research is far from the stereotype of the "old guy sitting behind a microscope all day."

Click here to read the full article

--By Veronica Weber / Palo Alto Weekly (July 11, 2014)

Posted 07/03/2014 08:26AM

Upper School Spanish students recently travelled to Sevilla, Spain, to practice their Spanish and to immerse themselves in the traditional culture. The students lived in home stays, took language classes, and visited Córdoba, Granada, and Cádiz. Highlights of the trip included watching Spain participate in the World Cup in a public plaza, and witnessing the historic passing of the crown to Felipe VI. What a trip to remember, or as the girls would say, ¡un viaje para recordar!

Academics
Posted 07/25/2014 08:26AM

Castilleja's Director of Technology, Gabe Lucas, and Academic Technology Support Specialist, Rachel Tennant, presented at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) 2014 Conference in Atlanta, an education technology conference that had 12,000+ attendees. In a session titled "Flexible Learning and Responsible Oversight with a Hybrid 1:1 iPad Model," they described how Castilleja manages our iPad pilot from grade to grade. The program -- and their presentation -- center on the ideas that a 1:1 iPad program can be scalable from 100 to 1000 (and more) devices and customizable to meet the developmental needs of each grade from K-12. To learn more check out the outline of their conference presentation, or read Castilleja Systems Manager Cameron Johnson's blog here.



Posted 07/03/2014 08:26AM

Upper School Spanish students recently travelled to Sevilla, Spain, to practice their Spanish and to immerse themselves in the traditional culture. The students lived in home stays, took language classes, and visited Córdoba, Granada, and Cádiz. Highlights of the trip included watching Spain participate in the World Cup in a public plaza, and witnessing the historic passing of the crown to Felipe VI. What a trip to remember, or as the girls would say, ¡un viaje para recordar!

Posted 06/09/2014 12:17PM

At a reception held on June 5, Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo (CA-18) presented April C. '15, Jolena M. '15,  Wings Y. '15, Claire H. '16, and Emily B. '16 with the 1st place award in the inaugural House Student App Challenge for their iPhone app, Trext, which aims to improve public safety by providing automatic location check-in for teens and parents. Trext was a Computer Science II ("Making Mobile Apps") final project and a Technovation Challenge Club project. It will be on display in the U.S. Capitol next year and be featured on the U.S. House of Representatives website.

Established by the U.S. House of Representatives in 2013, this competition is part of a nationwide event that invites high school students from all participating congressional districts to compete by creating and exhibiting their app for mobile, tablet, or computer devices on a platform of their choice. It is designed to promote innovation and engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education fields. Apps are judged based on the following criteria: quality of the idea, including creativity and originality; implementation of the idea, including user experience and design; and demonstrated excellence of coding and programming skills.

Posted 05/30/2014 08:06AM

The first annual Castilleja Mobile Apps Pitch Expo took place on Friday, May 23. Computer Science II students presented ten videotaped and live pitches that morning. A panel of industry experts including Evan Goldberg, Talat Imran, Jeff Rothschild, and Ann Johnson provided feedback. Each pitch described how the app addressed some need or opportunity, and demonstrated a portion of the app's functionality. Congratulations to all CS2 students for their hard work and accomplishment this semester!

Posted 07/23/2014 08:30AM

26 enthusiastic Middle School French students traveled to Paris in June with Evelyne Nicolaou, Doris Mourad, and Lauren Schryver. In addition to visiting renowned sites such as Notre Dame, the Louvre, Versailles, and Giverny, they also spent a morning in a girls' school, took a cooking class during which the girls prepared their own dinner, learned how to make baguettes and croissants at a top bakery in Paris, and spent an afternoon in the outskirts of Paris at a Maison Bourgeoise, where American pilots hid during World War II. The highlight for most was engaging with peers at St. Pie Catholic School in St. Cloud. A number of the girls exchanged emails and addresses to keep in touch!



Posted 07/21/2014 08:21AM

On June 15, Sanah Imran '14, Katherine Hobbs '13, and eight other students presented to a group of parents, physicians, and CEOs about their experiences as the first class of Lefteroff Interns at the Fogarty Institute for Innovation. The presentation, title "Rules of the Road: Navigating the Fogarty Institute," highlighted eight key lessons the interns learned during their internship, such as "always bring a pen and paper" and "embrace ugly ducklings."

Each intern spent time working on group and individual projects with one or more of the start-ups in the Institute, heard from influential guest speakers and CEOs, and spent time learning with physicians from El Camino Hospital.

Katherine researched the demographics and regulatory environment in Indonesia for InPress and Prescient devices, and also edited content for Materna Medical's website. Sanah, only a week deep in her internship, has also helped design and edit Materna's website, and is planning to help build new devices for clinical trials.

The Fogarty Institute for Innovation promotes medical innovation by providing support to promising innovators and researchers as they transform their creative ideas into practical solutions to improve patient care. They offer mentorship at every step of the process, coordinating access to intellectual, physical, and financial resources to propel medical concepts from initiation to application. For more information, please visit their website.

Posted 07/14/2014 11:25AM

In Jill Helms' laboratory at Stanford University — past a glass case filled with skulls of mice, ducks and a two-headed pig and shelves stocked with glass beakers and rows of chemicals — a group of high school interns are gathered around a lab work space feverishly working on a set of experiments.

As one intern gently applies a piece of transparent film onto a slide of a mouse tibia sliced as thin as tissue paper, recent Castilleja graduate Stephanie Flamen consults with research assistant Andrew Smith regarding the section of human DNA sequence displayed on her laptop. The sequence has not mutated the way she had hoped.

In her third summer working at the lab, Flamen is helping a group of researchers who are studying the stem cells of hair follicles and how certain proteins in the cells can be stimulated to trigger hair growth and potentially treat baldness, aid cancer patients who have lost hair or help individuals with alopecia.

"When you're bald you are still harboring stem cells, but the hair is in its resting phase. They've lost some signaling that would control the hair to keep growing," Flamen says as she excitedly explained her team's work. "We found a certain protein that could (give signals to cells) and could make hair grow longer, which was so cool because we're like, 'Oh, my God, we found the solution to Rogaine' — or a better version of it."

Flamen is just one of the many young students passionate about science who choose to spend their summers doing internships working directly with graduate and doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars and faculty who lead publicly and privately funded science research at institutions like Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, Stanford School of Medicine, NASA Ames and Lockheed Martin.

Far from washing glassware and fetching coffee, interns are given the responsibility to directly help with the research, involved in tasks like pipetting bimolecular samples, using high-tech lab equipment, analyzing vast amounts of data and programming. Oftentimes the work is later included in the research's findings in scientific papers.

In their 30 to 40 hours per week for eight to 10 weeks, interns may want to explore a future career; others are curious about the real-world applications of the science they study in school. Some seek job experience and a boost for college applications or the chance to enter their work in national competitions like the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology or the Intel Science Talent Search.

And many of their mentors say the internships not only directly provide more manpower towards their research but give them a chance to inspire the next generation to pursue science and show them that research is far from the stereotype of the "old guy sitting behind a microscope all day."

Click here to read the full article

--By Veronica Weber / Palo Alto Weekly (July 11, 2014)

Posted 05/15/2014 02:53PM

Castilleja Programming Club members Smriti P. '14, Mayuka S. '15, Anna V. '15, and Carly R. '14 enjoyed an afternoon of teaching computer science "unplugged" lessons for Girls to Women, a program that serves under-resourced elementary and early middle school-age girls and their families in East Palo Alto. CS Unplugged introduces students to computer science concepts such as binary numbers and graph coloring using games, puzzles, and other no-technology activities. Several times this semester, Programming Club members have also visited the Girls to Women center to teach Scratch programming and other logical thinking skills using laptops and iPads.

Upcoming Events
    • Monday - August 18, 2014 Upper School Athletics Begin
    • Monday - August 25, 2014 SCHOOL BEGINS - Activities for all grades begin
    • Thursday - August 28, 2014 Tie Ceremony 8:00 AM to 8:15 AMThe Circle

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