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Posted Wednesday, Sep 18, 2013 

The ACE Center and Alumnae Office have joined forces to try to add 25 new internships for either college-age alums or current juniors and seniors, to our database by December 1. It seems early to be thinking of summer internships, but December and early winter is prime time for companies to find summer interns!  

If you work for a company that has an internship program, would like to take on an intern, or would just be willing to provide the name of a contact at a company who might be able to steer us in the right direction, we'd really appreciate it!

Click to submit an internship

Click to submit a contact

Posted Wednesday, Feb 6, 2013 

As expected, former Sounders Women and University of Washington standout Kate Deines was among the four players signed by the Seattle Reign when free agency opened on Monday. The 23-year-old was joined by Welsh captain Jess Fishlock, Canadian international Tiffany Cameron and two-time All-American LIndsay Taylor.

The Reign were granted a fifth free-agent spot after the league learned that Amy Rodriguez would miss the entire season while pregnant with her first child. The Reign will also be without Megan Rapinoe and Teresa Noyola until June, as both are signed with European clubs. That extra spot won't be used, at least for now

Deines is probably the most recognizable of these names, being as she was a standout high school player in the area before going on to start at UW. She has played in the midfield, but was a center back with the Sounders last year.

The most accomplished of the group is probably Fishlock, who has 67 caps and 22 goals with Wales. The midfielder spent the last two seasons with Bristol Academy in the FA WSL and has also played for AZ Alkmaar, where they won successive Eredivisie titles.

Cameron is another midfielder who has three caps with the Canadian national team. The 22-year-old was a prolific scorer at Ohio State, scoring 40 goals in her career with 21 of them coming last year.

Taylor was a highly touted prospect when she came out of Stanford in 2011, and was the sixth overall pick in the WPS draft. She scored 20 goals as a senior and led Stanford to a NCAA Championship, playing alongside future Reign teammate Noyola.


Posted Monday, Jan 28, 2013 
During the Dartmouth women's basketball team's trip to Florida earlier this season, junior guard Eve Zelinger(Palo Alto, Calif.) reflected back on the state of the Dartmouth women's basketball team and summed it up with these words, "Dartmouth women's basketball is on the rise"

Zelinger, who has seen action in 50 career games and is averaging 2.5 points, counts her favorite moments as getting to know her teammates.

"My favorite series of moments have been getting to know my teammates, says Zelinger. "Bonding with them and getting to know them over the course of the season. We're already so close and it's been really fun getting to spend time with people you enjoy being with, especially this year. We have a solid group and we really all enjoy each other."

Zelinger, one of just three upperclassmen for the Big Green, has been tasked, along with fellow upperclassmen Faziah Steen (Detroit, Mich.) and Nicola Zimmer, (Chevy Chase, Md.) with bringing a group of seven freshmen and four sophomores together both on and off the court.

            The California native takes that very seriously and works really hard to make the underclassmen feel like they are a part of the team both on and off the court.

"It's a fun group," said Zelinger. "Faziah, Nicola and I are all really close, in fact, we all live on the same floor and we have been able to spend a lot of time together. As far as the underclassmen, they are just a great group and we're very fortunate to be able to play together."

            During the preseason, Zelinger and her fellow upperclassmen paired off with the "littles" and showed them around Hanover, with stops at Hanover staples, Lou's, Shyrl's Diner and Ice Cream Fore You. Just one example of how Zelinger, along with the rest of the veterans, have taken on leadership roles with the Big Green's young team.

            "When you have such a large group it's important that everyone feels included and we have really tried hard to incorporate everyone into the family, so to speak."

When looking back on her collegiate career, Zelinger will count Dartmouth's trip to California during her sophomore season as one of the highlights.

"Without a doubt, playing in California in front of all my friends and family was great and something you don't get to do much at this level," said Zelinger. "I will say that this year's trip to Florida was pretty sweet too, I think it might have something to do with the warm weather."

            Despite the current record, Zelinger believes that the Big Green squad is coming together and has it's best basketball ahead.

            "Our current record may not show it, but we are coming together and this team is very different from the past two season on the floor and even off the floor. We move better, the flow is better and the chemistry is better and I think that it's going to start showing up in the win-loss column very soon."

            The past two seasons Dartmouth has been unlucky in the win-loss category, but Zelinger thinks this group can be the group to change that.

"We haven't had the best records the last two seasons, but I believe that we can turn that around with this group. We all really enjoy each other and I believe that this program is on the rise."

            Zelinger, who has had the pleasure of having games on her birthday the last two seasons, is again looking forward to taking on three-time Ivy League champion, Princeton, at Leede Arena on her birthday this season.

"I'm really looking forward to that game," said Zelinger. "It's my birthday and it will be Senior Day for Faziah. It should be a fun weekend." Last season, Zelinger posted a career-high 16 points in a Big Green win over Columbia, the day after her birthday!

            If you know anything about Eve Zelinger, you know that there are two things that she is big on, anything involving crime and Jelly Belly sports beans!

In fact, Zelinger hopes to turn her fascination with crime into a career. During her high school days she was a Palo Alto Youth explorer, tagging along with the Palo Alto Police Department and even doing a few ride-a-longs and sting operations. She's also interested in the FBI and anything related to criminal justice. As for the sports Jelly Bellies, they can be found in her game bag. She always likes to eat a few of the blue ones before a game for a little burst of energy.

            No matter what she's doing on the court or off the court, Zelinger does it with a smile and puts 100 percent into whatever it is she is doing. She lives her life based on the following quote, "Hard work beats talent, when talent doesn't work hard."

            "I've taken this to heart," said Zelinger "And I try to give my best effort both on and off the court, I owe it to myself, my teammates and coaches."

Posted Wednesday, Nov 28, 2012 
Harvard senior captain Taylor Docter from Castilleja has been named to the All-Ivy League women's volleyball team. Docter was tabbed by the conference's coaches as a first-team selection.

Docter finished the season ranked third in the Ancient Eight in points per set (3.63) and was fourth in kills per set (3.12) while led the Crimson in kills for a third straight year.

The Los Altos native posted a career-best 12 double-doubles and also set career-highs in kills per set, digs (264) and digs per set (2.93). Her 23 kills at Dartmouth on Sept. 21 represented a new single-match high, while her 20 digs against Holy Cross on Sept. 25 were the most in her career.

Docter was named the Ivy League Player of the Week on Oct. 16 after averaging 5.00 kps and 2.57 dps while hitting .280 in wins over Cornell and Columbia and was named to the conference's honor roll four times. Additionally, the human developmental and regenerative biology concentrator was selected to the Capital One Academic All-District first team.

Docter will graduate in May as one of the most celebrated student-athletes in Harvard women's volleyball history. She is the first Crimson to be named to the All-Ivy League first team since 2004 and was also named to the second team as a junior a year ago. Docter ranks fourth all-time at Harvard in attack attempts (3,455), sixth in service aces (98), seventh in kills (980) and eighth in kills per set (2.67).
Posted Tuesday, Nov 6, 2012 

With the Class of 2012's first college midterms looming and homesickness setting in, the 6th graders decided to send them a little love: cookies from home! Each girl assembled a delicious packet of cookies, decorated a mailing box, and enclosed a hand-written note to Casti's most recent grads. Hopefully these care packages will brighten their day and give them a little boost. We miss you, Class of 2012, and hope you are enjoying your adventures beyond the Circle!

Posted Wednesday, Oct 24, 2012 

After coming back from a one-set deficit against Dartmouth on Friday to take a 2-1 lead, the Harvard women’s volleyball team led 8-4 in the fourth. Unbeknownst to captain and outside hitter Taylor Docter, she was only one kill away from breaking into the Crimson’s top-10 career kills leaders.

“I hadn’t been following at all,” Docter said. “My mom probably follows more than I do; she probably had it on her radar, but I had no clue. I’m glad no one said anything because that would have maybe made me nervous.”

Docter didn’t look nervous as she leapt to play a ball from freshman setter Hannah Schmidt and dropped it between the Big Green’s defense, registering her 15th and final kill of the evening.

Docter’s tenth double-double of the season—she reached 15 kills and 15 digs—was instrumental in Harvard’s victory, its first win against Dartmouth since 2008 and the first of Docter’s Crimson volleyball career.

“Dartmouth has always been one of those teams we have been very evenly matched with, but it has been one of those games where we walk away thinking we should have won, which is one of the worst feelings,” Docter said. “It felt really good to finally feel like we performed the way we should have.”

Docter’s final kill gave her 922 on her career, tying her with Katie Turley-Molony ’07.

“It’s exciting, especially because we still have six games, so hopefully I can get in some more kills and move up the list,” said Docter, who currently trails Katherine Hart ’01 by 11 kills.

Since her freshman year, Docter has developed into the Crimson’s top offensive threat. She currently ranks fifth in Crimson history in attack attempts, sixth in service aces, and eighth in kills per set average. Despite now reaching the top ten in a fourth category, Docter is more concerned with winning games than personal achievements.

“She’s very excited about all of that, but she doesn’t want to be in the limelight,” Crimson coach Jennifer Weiss said. “She just wants the whole team to do well. She is very much a team player and it’s so genuine, which is refreshing to see.”

Docter credits her teammates for her success, especially Schmidt. Harvard plays with two setters on the court, but the rookie is the one who supports Docter in most of her kills because of her place in the rotation.

“She has been doing an awesome job,” Docter said. “A lot of the reason we are doing better recently is because she has totally sped up her offense.”

Friday’s game was a showcase of the Crimson’s attack, which led Harvard back after the team dropped the first set. The Crimson displayed a balanced attack in its 3-1 victory, with Docter, junior right side Erin Cooney, and freshman outside hitter Kathleen Wallace all registering double-digit kills for Harvard.

After going 2-9 to open the season—including a loss to the Big Green in September—the Crimson is currently riding a three-game winning streak, its longest of the season. Docter believes that her and the team’s recent success is a testament to teamwork.

“When you are playing with the same girls every year, a lot of it just comes from getting better at playing with the girls next to you,” Docter said. “They help me look good because they are improving as well.”

After playing front row as a freshman, Docter has put in the hard work to become a more well-rounded player. Each year she has seen increased playing time in the back row, and this year she is playing all six rotations.

“She has always been an impact attacker for us,” Weiss said. “She is diversifying her shots, and she has worked on the back row attack and the defense. [The record] is a credit to her hard work and belief that practice matters.”

Weiss credits Docter’s fitness level and focus entering the season.

“She was here this summer working in the lab but she was also working out,” Weiss said. “She’s very diligent about that so when we got to preseason she was ready to go. She has really committed a lot of time and energy to the team.”

And now Docter has permanently cemented her place in Harvard history. With six games left to play, she has ample opportunity to climb the all-time career list. Docter, who averages 3.19 kills per set, sits 53 behind seventh-place Kat McKinley ’09.

“Taylor is a gifted athlete and a hard worker,” Weiss said. “If you stay patient over time, good things will happen, and good things are happening for her.”

Posted Wednesday, Oct 17, 2012 

Last month, seven Washington, DC area alumnae (spanning 5 decades) and their guests gathered at the National Museum of Women in the Arts on for a private tour of the museum's collections followed by lunch at the Old Ebbitt Grill. The Castilleja Alumnae Association sponsored the event. The group represented over five decades of Castilleja's commitment to excellence in women's education, and included members of the classes of 1966, 1986, 1999, 2002, and 2007. Future alumna events are planned for the DC area and will include opportunities for community service as well as opportunities for networking and socializing.

Pictured (l to r): Nancy Tate ’66, Anne-Marie “Punky” Chun ’07, Natalie Adams ’99, and Whitney Brown ’02 ;(not pictured): Lisa Ide ’86 and Rachel Steyer ’07.

Posted Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012 

As a senior, Taylor Docter is enjoying her best year as a member of the Harvard women’s volleyball team. Docter had 21 kills against Columbia on Saturday, two below the career high that she set earlier this year in a five-set loss to Dartmouth. She added 12 digs and 23 total points, tying her best score from this year. After seven straight losses, Docter and the rest of the Crimson have rallied to win five of seven to move into third in the Ivy League, with one of the losses being a tight five-setter against second-place Princeton. For the weekend, Docter had 35 kills, 18 digs, and 40 points as the Crimson knocked off the two teams below them in the standings in Cornell and Columbia—dropping only one set in the process and moving from fifth to third in the conference.

Posted Tuesday, Oct 16, 2012 

PBS' NOVA scienceNOW interviewed Casti alumna Victoria "Tory" Wobber '01 about her research into the different social skill abilities of humans versus apes. Tory, a post-doctoral fellow in Harvard University's psychology department, is investigating the evolutionary origins and underlying mechanisms of human social behavior. In the article she describes her research into the differences between humans' ability to manipulate their environment and the capacity of our closest primate relatives, as well as species differences in goal identification. Read the full article to learn more, or check out her webpage at Harvard!

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Posted 07/17/2014 08:31AM

On Casti's campus athletes are taking advantage of the summer to brush up on technique. Castilleja's Varsity coaches are conducting summer clinics for girls. Volleyball Head Coach Jac Heler just completed four days of clinics for both Middle School and Upper School athletes. Softball Coach Robert Burley will run a Middle School clinic August 11th through 15th. For more information click here or contact Athletic Director Mary Jo Pruitt.

Posted 07/14/2014 11:25AM

In Jill Helms' laboratory at Stanford University — past a glass case filled with skulls of mice, ducks and a two-headed pig and shelves stocked with glass beakers and rows of chemicals — a group of high school interns are gathered around a lab work space feverishly working on a set of experiments.

As one intern gently applies a piece of transparent film onto a slide of a mouse tibia sliced as thin as tissue paper, recent Castilleja graduate Stephanie Flamen consults with research assistant Andrew Smith regarding the section of human DNA sequence displayed on her laptop. The sequence has not mutated the way she had hoped.

In her third summer working at the lab, Flamen is helping a group of researchers who are studying the stem cells of hair follicles and how certain proteins in the cells can be stimulated to trigger hair growth and potentially treat baldness, aid cancer patients who have lost hair or help individuals with alopecia.

"When you're bald you are still harboring stem cells, but the hair is in its resting phase. They've lost some signaling that would control the hair to keep growing," Flamen says as she excitedly explained her team's work. "We found a certain protein that could (give signals to cells) and could make hair grow longer, which was so cool because we're like, 'Oh, my God, we found the solution to Rogaine' — or a better version of it."

Flamen is just one of the many young students passionate about science who choose to spend their summers doing internships working directly with graduate and doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars and faculty who lead publicly and privately funded science research at institutions like Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, Stanford School of Medicine, NASA Ames and Lockheed Martin.

Far from washing glassware and fetching coffee, interns are given the responsibility to directly help with the research, involved in tasks like pipetting bimolecular samples, using high-tech lab equipment, analyzing vast amounts of data and programming. Oftentimes the work is later included in the research's findings in scientific papers.

In their 30 to 40 hours per week for eight to 10 weeks, interns may want to explore a future career; others are curious about the real-world applications of the science they study in school. Some seek job experience and a boost for college applications or the chance to enter their work in national competitions like the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology or the Intel Science Talent Search.

And many of their mentors say the internships not only directly provide more manpower towards their research but give them a chance to inspire the next generation to pursue science and show them that research is far from the stereotype of the "old guy sitting behind a microscope all day."

Click here to read the full article

--By Veronica Weber / Palo Alto Weekly (July 11, 2014)

Posted 07/03/2014 08:26AM

Upper School Spanish students recently travelled to Sevilla, Spain, to practice their Spanish and to immerse themselves in the traditional culture. The students lived in home stays, took language classes, and visited Córdoba, Granada, and Cádiz. Highlights of the trip included watching Spain participate in the World Cup in a public plaza, and witnessing the historic passing of the crown to Felipe VI. What a trip to remember, or as the girls would say, ¡un viaje para recordar!

Posted 06/18/2014 01:34PM

With crimson bouquets clutched close to crisp white dresses, 61 seniors took the stage amidst the faculty, staff and junior class at Castilleja School's 107th commencement ceremony on Saturday, an occasion that lauded femininity and found inspiration in favorite books and movies.

After those gathered sang "America the Beautiful," Senior Class President and Castilleja Award Winner Smriti Pramanick opened the ceremony with Rudyard Kipling's "If--," a poem she modified at its end to laughter and applause as "Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, and -- which is more -- you'll be a woman, my girl!"

Other speakers echoed this emphasis on femininity during the independent, Palo Alto all-girl school's ceremony. Valedictorian Paulette Wolak recounted a humorous anecdote in which the Castilleja girls learned that sexism still abounds in progressive Palo Alto, at least at a bike shop they visited for a senior seminar.

Shock, anger and amusement ensued, Wolak said, when the owner glossed over the changing of tires, his rationale being that women -- "damsels in distress" -- could just wait for a man at the side of the road should they ever encounter bike trouble.

Despite the desire to "chastise the bike shop owner for his insulting words," she said, the girls decided "This was not the appropriate time to 'lean in,'" citing one of Castilleja's favorite phrases from Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Instead, they found humor in the situation and settled on displaying courtesy to their host while knowing their capabilities are more than he gave them credit for.

In her speech, Head of School Nanci Kauffman referenced the boldness, independence and authenticity of Katniss Everdeen, a teen female icon and protagonist of the fictional "The Hunger Games," saying, "She sounds an awful lot like a Casti grad!"

"Hunger Games" was one of several pop culture references made on Saturday, including the senior class' choral rendition of "You'll Be in My Heart," from Disney's "Tarzan," and a quote from Winnie the Pooh in Pramanick's speech.

"You can't stay in your corner of the forest, waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes," she said, quoting A.A. Milne's anthropomorphic bear while encouraging her fellow grads not to fear risk.

Healthy risk-taking was also touted in the message from guest speaker Emily White, COO of the popular photo-messaging app Snapchat. She encouraged grads to "take risks that make you excited."

"Never forget how it felt when you were younger," she said, mentioning the "spirit of freedom" and the "permission of youth" that can and should be carried into adulthood.

And every Castilleja senior did carry an air of youthful freedom and jubilation as she walked across the stage to collect her diploma, pausing only to shake hands with the faculty and grin for the flashing camera.

Each graduate also had a substantial cheering section, as bursts of applause and hollers erupted after each name. At the ceremony's close, the school hosted a reception for the families, seating each grad and their loved ones at a table adorned with a framed photograph of the graduate and a decorated graduation cap.

Arthur Zetes stood and cheered loudly for his granddaughter Hannah Mazonson when her name was called. He said he found the ceremony "terrific" but also would like to have heard a mention of the value of wisdom.

"Look for it. Get it. Keep it," he said.

In the coming years, he'll be able to remind his granddaughter of this lesson while she attends Dartmouth in Zete's home state of New Hampshire.

The graduation marked a special moment for Tibi McCann, mother to Cassidy McCann Jensen, and the family's three sets of grandparents.

"She's the first granddaughter to graduate from high school," McCann said tearily.

Mark Bernstein, father of grad Gaelin Sullivan Bernstein, remarked, "Every girl has a sense of purpose and character that are quite unique." He credited teachers who are "dedicated to challenging (students) to do better."

The theme of character was also highlighted Saturday at the school, whose "five C's" -- instilled within the girls throughout their time there -- are conscience, courtesy, character, courage and charity.

As Alina Brown, a Castilleja Award winner, said in her speech to her classmates, "My challenge to you, Class of 2014 ... is to search for people of character who are not afraid to stand up for what they believe in."

Kauffman, too, touched on the challenges of making the right choices, a difficulty that can be eased by strong character. She encouraged the girls to ask themselves "What would Katniss do?" in tough situations.

"Guided by the principles of character you share with her," Kauffman said, "I am certain of one thing for sure: The odds will be ever in your favor!"

Originally Posted by Palo Alto Online June 8, 2014
Written by Lena Pressesky, Palo Alto Weekly

Academics
Posted 07/03/2014 08:26AM

Upper School Spanish students recently travelled to Sevilla, Spain, to practice their Spanish and to immerse themselves in the traditional culture. The students lived in home stays, took language classes, and visited Córdoba, Granada, and Cádiz. Highlights of the trip included watching Spain participate in the World Cup in a public plaza, and witnessing the historic passing of the crown to Felipe VI. What a trip to remember, or as the girls would say, ¡un viaje para recordar!

Posted 06/09/2014 12:17PM

At a reception held on June 5, Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo (CA-18) presented April C. '15, Jolena M. '15,  Wings Y. '15, Claire H. '16, and Emily B. '16 with the 1st place award in the inaugural House Student App Challenge for their iPhone app, Trext, which aims to improve public safety by providing automatic location check-in for teens and parents. Trext was a Computer Science II ("Making Mobile Apps") final project and a Technovation Challenge Club project. It will be on display in the U.S. Capitol next year and be featured on the U.S. House of Representatives website.

Established by the U.S. House of Representatives in 2013, this competition is part of a nationwide event that invites high school students from all participating congressional districts to compete by creating and exhibiting their app for mobile, tablet, or computer devices on a platform of their choice. It is designed to promote innovation and engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education fields. Apps are judged based on the following criteria: quality of the idea, including creativity and originality; implementation of the idea, including user experience and design; and demonstrated excellence of coding and programming skills.

Posted 05/30/2014 08:06AM

The first annual Castilleja Mobile Apps Pitch Expo took place on Friday, May 23. Computer Science II students presented ten videotaped and live pitches that morning. A panel of industry experts including Evan Goldberg, Talat Imran, Jeff Rothschild, and Ann Johnson provided feedback. Each pitch described how the app addressed some need or opportunity, and demonstrated a portion of the app's functionality. Congratulations to all CS2 students for their hard work and accomplishment this semester!

Posted 05/29/2014 08:27AM

On Wednesday the Advanced Topics Physics class transformed the Middle School Lower Level and the Sunken Patio into a "mini-Exploratorium." The students built exhibits that demonstrate a fundamental science concept, either of their own design or based on an Exploratorium exhibit or activity. Concepts included everything from the density of different gases to the surface tension required to create a bubble. Each station delighted guests, including a group of elementary schoolers from Brentwood School, and the seniors taught all their visitors a thing or two about how scientific principles affect the world around us.

Posted 07/21/2014 08:21AM

On June 15, Sanah Imran '14, Katherine Hobbs '13, and eight other students presented to a group of parents, physicians, and CEOs about their experiences as the first class of Lefteroff Interns at the Fogarty Institute for Innovation. The presentation, title "Rules of the Road: Navigating the Fogarty Institute," highlighted eight key lessons the interns learned during their internship, such as "always bring a pen and paper" and "embrace ugly ducklings."

Each intern spent time working on group and individual projects with one or more of the start-ups in the Institute, heard from influential guest speakers and CEOs, and spent time learning with physicians from El Camino Hospital.

Katherine researched the demographics and regulatory environment in Indonesia for InPress and Prescient devices, and also edited content for Materna Medical's website. Sanah, only a week deep in her internship, has also helped design and edit Materna's website, and is planning to help build new devices for clinical trials.

The Fogarty Institute for Innovation promotes medical innovation by providing support to promising innovators and researchers as they transform their creative ideas into practical solutions to improve patient care. They offer mentorship at every step of the process, coordinating access to intellectual, physical, and financial resources to propel medical concepts from initiation to application. For more information, please visit their website.

Posted 07/14/2014 11:25AM

In Jill Helms' laboratory at Stanford University — past a glass case filled with skulls of mice, ducks and a two-headed pig and shelves stocked with glass beakers and rows of chemicals — a group of high school interns are gathered around a lab work space feverishly working on a set of experiments.

As one intern gently applies a piece of transparent film onto a slide of a mouse tibia sliced as thin as tissue paper, recent Castilleja graduate Stephanie Flamen consults with research assistant Andrew Smith regarding the section of human DNA sequence displayed on her laptop. The sequence has not mutated the way she had hoped.

In her third summer working at the lab, Flamen is helping a group of researchers who are studying the stem cells of hair follicles and how certain proteins in the cells can be stimulated to trigger hair growth and potentially treat baldness, aid cancer patients who have lost hair or help individuals with alopecia.

"When you're bald you are still harboring stem cells, but the hair is in its resting phase. They've lost some signaling that would control the hair to keep growing," Flamen says as she excitedly explained her team's work. "We found a certain protein that could (give signals to cells) and could make hair grow longer, which was so cool because we're like, 'Oh, my God, we found the solution to Rogaine' — or a better version of it."

Flamen is just one of the many young students passionate about science who choose to spend their summers doing internships working directly with graduate and doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars and faculty who lead publicly and privately funded science research at institutions like Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, Stanford School of Medicine, NASA Ames and Lockheed Martin.

Far from washing glassware and fetching coffee, interns are given the responsibility to directly help with the research, involved in tasks like pipetting bimolecular samples, using high-tech lab equipment, analyzing vast amounts of data and programming. Oftentimes the work is later included in the research's findings in scientific papers.

In their 30 to 40 hours per week for eight to 10 weeks, interns may want to explore a future career; others are curious about the real-world applications of the science they study in school. Some seek job experience and a boost for college applications or the chance to enter their work in national competitions like the Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology or the Intel Science Talent Search.

And many of their mentors say the internships not only directly provide more manpower towards their research but give them a chance to inspire the next generation to pursue science and show them that research is far from the stereotype of the "old guy sitting behind a microscope all day."

Click here to read the full article

--By Veronica Weber / Palo Alto Weekly (July 11, 2014)

Posted 05/15/2014 02:53PM

Castilleja Programming Club members Smriti P. '14, Mayuka S. '15, Anna V. '15, and Carly R. '14 enjoyed an afternoon of teaching computer science "unplugged" lessons for Girls to Women, a program that serves under-resourced elementary and early middle school-age girls and their families in East Palo Alto. CS Unplugged introduces students to computer science concepts such as binary numbers and graph coloring using games, puzzles, and other no-technology activities. Several times this semester, Programming Club members have also visited the Girls to Women center to teach Scratch programming and other logical thinking skills using laptops and iPads.

Posted 05/01/2014 01:02PM

While all sophomores developed social enterprise concepts during Global Week, four groups decided to make an intense commitment to prepare a pitch for seed money in front of a panel of external adjudicators. On April 4, the teams proposed the following ideas:

  • "STEMist Doll,"a BFF who sleeps in your bed but lives her life in a virtual world that teaches programming to girls (Lea S., Kavya T., and Katherine S.)
  • "BikeBright," a light that gathers its energy from the wheels of a bicycle donated for a child to ride to school (Molly L., Shivani N., and Heejin H.)
  • "Mezzo," an app designed to optimize food donations from restaurants and farmers' markets to shelters (Heejung C., Claire H., and Aimee A.)
  • "Casti-Jigriti Bridge," a program that raises funds via a fee-based app training program in the US to fund a parallel program in an under-resourced school in Jigriti, India (Julie P. and Nayanika K.)

Mezzo and STEMist were selected to advance to the final round on April 23 to describe their innovations in greater depth. Each team delivered a stellar presentation, and then entertained questions from the audience. A small group of judges experienced with "pitches" attended to give students feedback on their presentations, along with members of Castilleja's Leadership Team.

Congratulations to Mezzo, who received the seed money to launch their app! Stay tuned for news on how their social enterprise is progressing and for opportunities to get involved.

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